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African Grain Summit – Pr Kayanja Urges Farmer Negotiators to Boost African Agriculture

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african grain summit pr kayanja urges farmer negotiators to boost african agriculture
african grain summit pr kayanja urges farmer negotiators to boost african agriculture
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In a recent presentation, Pr Robert Kayanja emphasized the importance of having negotiators in African agriculture. He believes that for agriculture to succeed, negotiators are essential because relying solely on money from commercial banks won’t lead to significant food growth.

Pr Kayanja, from Yohua Life Ltd, made this call during his presentation on “Bulk Grain Production for Sustainable African Food Systems: A Myth or Reality.” He stressed that a dedicated team is necessary to connect farmers with essential services like financing, markets, and machinery subsidies.

Kayanja pointed out that it’s not only the government’s responsibility to support agriculture; farmer negotiators play a crucial role in advocating for the farming community’s needs. He expressed disappointment that Africa still imports food when it should be exporting to countries facing food deficits.

Additionally, Pr Kayanja highlighted the importance of negotiation when acquiring land for farming. He shared his experience in Karamoja, where successful land acquisition was achieved through negotiations involving clan leaders, landowners, and farmer aggregators. He emphasized that all three parties must collaborate, as each brings unique contributions to the table.

This call for negotiators came during the 10th African Grain Summit held at Speke Resort Munyonyo in Kampala. The summit attracted technology providers from various countries, showcasing innovations such as storage bags, silos, grain processing facilities, and aflatoxin testing kits.

Gerald Masila, the Executive Director of the Eastern African Grain Council, stressed the need to find a place for Africa in the global grain trade. The summit’s discussions centered on policy issues and recommendations to improve agriculture and reduce the continent’s reliance on imports.

Technology provider Marcos Brandalise from Brazil advocated for sustainable farming practices, including minimum tillage of land. He called on African governments and the private sector to support smallholder farmers with machinery.

Eng David Perry, representing a UK company specializing in grain processing and storage, and aflatoxin management technology, emphasized the need for fair financing for machinery importers.

Other suggestions included exploring alternatives to grains in livestock feed, such as insect-based foods, to ensure a stable supply of grains for human consumption, reducing competition between humans and livestock for the same crops.