Home Education Uganda’s Education Expenditure Critically Below Regional Standards, World Bank Warns

Uganda’s Education Expenditure Critically Below Regional Standards, World Bank Warns

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ugandas education expenditure critically below regional standards world bank warns
ugandas education expenditure critically below regional standards world bank warns
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According to the World Bank’s analysis of public spending on education, Uganda’s expenditure on education in 2021 was equivalent to 2.7% of its GDP, significantly lower than the recommended minimum level of 4% and below the average spending of selected East African countries. This disparity underscores the need for increased investment in education to foster national development.

The report indicates that Uganda primarily finances its education budget through domestic resources, with public education spending totaling Shs3.6 trillion from the national budget in the Financial Year 2022, supplemented by Shs83 billion from development partners.

Comparatively, Tanzania, Rwanda, Kenya, and Ethiopia have allocated higher percentages of their GDP to education, with spending ranging from 3.3% to 5.1% in recent years.

Despite an increase in public education spending over the past decade, particularly in higher education, Uganda’s allocation remains inadequate, especially at the primary and secondary levels. This inadequacy is reflected in the low proportion of government expenditure per student compared to regional averages.

Primary education receives the largest share of public funding, but higher education, which tends to benefit students from wealthier households, receives the second-largest allocation. This pattern contributes to regressive expenditures in the education sector.

Wages constitute a significant portion of Uganda’s education spending, with teachers being the largest recipients. However, despite their pivotal role, teachers in Uganda are not well compensated compared to similarly educated professionals. Salaries for teachers with university degrees are notably lower than the national average for other professionals, highlighting disparities within the education sector.

The World Bank’s report underscores the importance of prioritizing education spending to ensure equitable access to quality education across all levels and to support the professional development and welfare of educators.

By addressing these disparities and increasing investment in education, Uganda can work towards achieving its development goals and fostering a more inclusive and prosperous society.